Food Packaging: uncovering the history

International Symposium, 1-2 Dec. 2017, Tokyo Convenors: Prof. Katarzyna J. Cwiertka (Leiden University) and Prof. Masanobu Ishikawa (Kobe University) This will be the very first symposium on the history of food packaging to bring together scholars and industry experts with the aim of mapping the agenda for investigating this as yet largely uncharted topic. It will offer a unique opportunity for discussion for anthropologists, economists, geographers, historians, and sociologists interested in, or working on, any aspect of food packaging history since 1900. Selected papers will be published in a special issue of the open-access journal Worldwide Waste: Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies (www.worldwidewastejournal.com) The symposium will be organised jointly by Leiden University and Kobe University, in close cooperation with 3×3 Lab Future and Gomi Japan. It is funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO), as part of the activities undertaken within the framework of the Garbage Matters Project. More information soon to...

Launch of new journal: Worldwide Waste

We are proud and excited to announce the launch of our new journal, titled Worldwide Waste: Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies. Worldwide Waste is an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal presenting innovative research on waste from around the world. It critically interrogates the cultural, social, economic and political systems within which waste is created, managed, and circulated. The inaugural volume of Worldwide Waste is planned for early 2017, so please consider submitting your paper now. We welcome all submissions that fit within the scope of the journal. Full details on the journal and on how to prepare and submit a manuscript can be found at worldwidewastejournal.com. We would like to thank the scholars who have already committed to being on our editorial board. If you’d like to be involved with this journal, then please get in touch with Prof. Katarzyna Cwiertka at [email protected] Please feel free to forward this message to anyone else who might be interested in publishing with us, and help make this journal a success by submitting your work for...

Conference Report: Waste in Asia (ASIEN)

In the latest issue of the journal of the German Association for Asian studies (DGA, Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Asienkunde), ASIEN, No. 141, Stephanie Assman wrote a conference report on the Waste in Asia conference, held in Leiden in June: Waste in Asia , Leiden, the Netherlands, June 9–11, 2016 Organized by food historian Katarzyna Cwiertka in cooperation with the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NOW), the Garbage Matters Project at the University of Leiden, the Netherlands, hosted the conference Waste in Asia (WiA) from June 9–11, 2016. In a pioneering effort, the conference brought together twenty-nine scholars from anthropology, sociology, economics, literature, art, history and landscape architecture. Economist Masanobu Ishikawa (Kobe University) delivered the keynote speech and stressed the significance of public waste prevention awareness campaigns. Four major issues were explored in nine panels. Firstly, food waste emerged as a pertinent issue. Kohei Watanabe (Teikyo University) noted that “half of kitchen waste is edible”. Several presenters identified waste-creating behaviors such as an obsession with freshness and explored strategies to prevent food waste. Whereas food producers in Japan are encouraged to reduce packaging waste through Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) policies, several countries in Asia seek to “shape a responsible consumer” through state intervention programs and educational initiatives. A public education media campaign might be a way to tackle food waste in Beijing, as Shuxi Yin (Hefei University) asserted. Won-Chung Kim (Sungkyunkwan University) investigated the implementation of a radio frequency identification disposal system in Korea, whereas Stephanie Assmann (Hokkaido University) examined a governmental No-Foodloss campaign in Japan. Tammara Soma (University of Toronto) questioned accepted notions of gender equality in her paper...

Lecture: the Japanese culture of giving

On the closing day of the popular exhibition ‘Too Pretty to Throw Away’ – still on view until Sunday August 28 – Prof. Dr. Katarzyna J. Cwiertka will hold a public lecture at SieboldHuis Leiden, Rapenburg 19. The lecture will be given on August 28 between 2 – 3 PM and is called “Japanse warenhuizen en de cadeaucultuur” – Japanese department stores and the culture of giving. The lecture will be in Dutch. In the early decades of the 20th century, the first big department stores opened in Japan, based on the so-called ‘Grands Magasins’ of Paris, London, Philadelphia and New York. In that time, large department stores were the summum of modernity with their lavish product presentations and technical innovations like elevators and escalators. However, nowadays, Japanese department stores are presenting themselves as guardians of Japanese traditions, a point stressed by the importance put on formal gift giving. In this lecture, Prof. Cwiertka will talk on how this change has taken place. Attending lecture is free after entering the SieboldHuis museum. Please register through the following link: Japanse warenhuizen en de cadeaucultuur. Lecture: Japanse warenhuizen en de cadeaucultuur, Prof. Katarynza Cwiertka When: August 28 2016, 2-3 PM Where: SieboldHuis, Rapenburg 19,...

Waste in Asia Conference: Discussing Waste as a Global/Local Phenomenon

Between 9 and 11 June 2016, the conference Waste in Asia was held at Leiden University. The conference was organized by Prof. Katarzyna J. Cwiertka and hosted by the Garbage Matters Project. Twenty-nine speakers from around the world – including Taiwan, China, Korea, India, Sri Lanka, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands – gathered to discuss waste-related issues ranging from food waste in China and Indonesia, to recycling in Taiwan, to the representation of waste in film and literature in the Philippines and Korea. Waste was investigated both as an end product and as an object of transformation, or even a resource. Participants debated the ambivalence of waste and the ways in which waste circulates within and between countries. For an impression of the conference, please check out the pictures that are published on our website...