Masanobu Ishikawa

Waste in Asia 2016 Conference Opening & Keynote Address : How and Why Waste Matters in Asia: An Economic Point of View Masanobu Ishikawa, Kobe University Bio: Professor Ishikawa is a professor of environmental economics at the Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University, and sits as an expert on recycling on a number of councils and committees including the MOE, MAFF and METI. He has served as the president of the Society of Packaging Science and Technology, Japan (2004-2008) and as a council member of the Japan Containers and Packaging Recycling Association since its foundation in 1996. He was awarded the Best Paper Award in 1997 and the Society Award in 2002 from the Society of Packaging Science and Technology Japan. In 2006, he established an NPO, Gomi-jp, which aims to reduce waste through social re-design. Gomi-jp was awarded the Good Design Award in 2007, the Prime Minister’s Prize at the 3Rs Promotion Merit Awards in 2014 and the Golden Prize of the Minister of the Environment in the 2015 Low Carbon Cup. Abstract: Waste matters everywhere in the world, but especially in Asia. World cities generate 1.3 billion tons of solid waste (MSW), and this figure is expected to rise to 2.2 billion tons by 2025 (World Bank 2012). Because of this rapid increase in MSW, waste management costs will increase from $205.4 billion in 2012 to $373.5 billion by 2025 (World Bank 2012). MSW generation in Asia comprises 38% of global waste generation, a share that will increase to 50% by 2025. Asia is characterized by a wide variety of climates, cultures, histories, economic developments, and types...